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“C-Posture”

33.10%- I have a C-Posture
41.61%- I have neutral posture
25.30% I have S-Posture

Defined-

Is described as a posture that occurs when you shoulders are slumped forward at address and you have a definitive roundness to your back form your tail bone to the back of your neck. This fault causes a hunched over position at address with the player’s shoulders slumped forward. As a result the player will find it difficult to maintain posture as they swing the club back w/o keeping the backswing short and wide.

Causes-

1.    Upper cross syndrome- which is tight or shortened Pec major and minor, upper trap and levator scapula, and lats and SCM (long neck muscle on the side of your neck from your head to your clavicle). With these tightnesses is the opposing weakness of the serratus anterior and the deep neck flexors and lower trapezius.
(tests- Overhead deep squat, Reach, Roll and lift, Lat test)

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Other causes-
1.    Lack of proper instruction; not understanding correct setup
2.    Lack of pelvic tilt; causing the upper body to bend while addressing the ball
3.    Clubs that are too short
4.    Standing to far away from the ball
5.    Grip that is too much in the fingers of both hands

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Hi kids!

Dee here with your next video…

Watch this video to find out how to make your shoulders more mobile which will allow you to hit it farther without pain!

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Hello GFG fans, Dee here to talk about getting those hips to work better which will take away back pain, shoulder pain, and help you hit it farther!

So we all know that every single one of you out there wants to hit it farther and also play golf without back or shoulder pain…right?

Yes…that is the answer, and Tyler and I know that no matter your age or handicap, distance and pain are almost number one and two on the list of “ultimate golf desires!”

Well today I will show you how to help those hips get looser, which will take pressure of the low back and increase both your back swing and follow through!

Check it out…

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Tyler here adding my 2 cents again concerning the dreaded chicken wing.  I don’t think this one is as controversial as the sway topic but I think there are some other factors to consider anytime you are addressing chicken wings.

Rotation is one of the big keys to the golf swing.  If you don’t rotate your chest through the ball then you are more than likely going to chicken wing.  This is one of those, don’t try to fix the chicken wing without fixing the rotation first type of things.  One of your goals in the golf swing is to swing the club out toward the target after you hit the ball.  You know this, I know it, and the brain knows it.  If you don’t have your chest open as you strike the ball then the left arm should bend to keep the club moving toward the target (if it stayed straight then the club would swing out to the right).  The one exception for this is if you are able to side bend like crazy.  I’ve only witnessed one person who was good at this, and his body is paying for it.

The reason I pick on this distinction is that rotation should happen first and if it doesn’t the chicken wing is going to show up.  I give lots of lessons where the golfer sees the chicken wing and immediately interrupts me with, “see, I’m bending my arm again.”  I always counter with, “did you rotate?”  Unless that is a yes, then I don’t care about the chicken wing, it is a cause and not the effect.  Fix something earlier in the swing and the chicken wing will usually disappear…that is of course, if you are physically capable of it.

Good luck golfers, enjoy the U.S. Open this week and see what you can learn from them.

Tyler

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Dee here still pouring out those nasty golf swing faults you need to correct.

“Chicken Winging”


35.55% Lead arm line doesn’t match lead arm- bent
64.45% Lead arm line matches lead arm- straight

Defined-

Is a loss of extension or breakdown of the lead elbow through the impact area. This swing fault makes it difficult to develop speed or power and tends to put excessive force on the outside of the elbow joint (tennis elbow).

Causes-

1.    Lead arm strength and lead side shoulder flexibility are paramount for a strong and fully extended lead arm at impact. If the arm is unable to rotate around the shoulder due to joint or muscular restrictions then chicken winging will dominate the pattern.
(tests- 90/90, Reach, Roll and lift, Lat test)

2.    If the downswing is out of sequence and your club is traveling on an over-the-top
path, the lead arm is almost always forced to chicken wing due to the direction of the
forces that are applied to it.

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Other causes-
1.    Lack of understanding of proper technique

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Greetings loyal readers.  Tyler here, following up on Dee’s post to put in my 2 cents on the sway and possibly adding to that “other causes” section.

For me the sway is a funny move.  We are taught at TPI school that sway is a sequence (and consistency killer).  It definitely makes it harder to control the bottom of the swing.  It definitely makes it harder to release the club the way Ben Hogan described it.   And it definitely contributes to a reverse spine angle – the number 2 cause of back pain.  So where am I going with this, all of these things sound bad, right?

Camilo Villegas and Vijay Singh both sway in their golf swing.  You can look at some swings on YouTube and see it, but 3D motion analysis has confirmed it.  They sway.  Camillo is top 5 in ball striking this year and Vijay is known for being one of the best ball strikers of all time.  So 2 great ball strikers sway, in my book that means that it can’t be all bad.  But if we evaluate them further we can see a little bit of what makes it work.

In order to sway you must practice non-stop.  Camilo has toned it down according to an interview he gave in January, but early on in his career he was a range rat – always working on it.  He would work on it, but he was not very technical.  He has said before that he sees his swing coach a couple times a year and gets stuff to work on, but it is mostly feel.  So warning number one, unless you are willing to hit balls everyday you are going to struggle with a sway.

In order to sway you must have a scoopy release.  Yes you heard me.  A scoopy release.  Both Camilo and Vijay have very active lower bodies and a release where the right hand works more under the left not as much around the left as is more common.  In order to lean the shaft towards the target, that means they must slide their lower bodies forward to get in front.  A slide with a scoop is hard to maximize distance with.  Unless you are a strong athletic guy, don’t sway or you’ll have trouble compressing the ball and getting distance.

In staying with the scoop, I want to bring up one last point.  If you feel/see/think that the club should be released in a scoopy fashion then a sway will help you and don’t try to correct the sway until you correct the release.  If you do, you will instantly start hitting the ball worse and won’t commit to not swaying long enough to make it automatic so that you can go after the scoop.  Scoop first, then sway.  Got it?

In closing, there are lots of reasons that a golfer will sway so attack them in this order.  First, clear the body.  Dee is right, if you can’t internally rotate your trail hip, if you can’t separate, if you have ankle problems then fix that stuff first.  Secondly, decide if you need to fix the sway.  If you sway and have contact issues (lots of fat and topped shots) then you should fix the sway.  This is easier to do on grass then inside because the contact will be one of your best forms of biofeedback.  Hitting on mats will let you be sloppy with contact AND with release, be careful with this issue.  Thirdly, if you are going to fix the sway, then look at the release first.  If you know what you want to do with your hands, it will make a lot more sense to not sway with your body.

Good luck golfers, and stay tuned for tomorrow’s post by Dee about the chicken wing.

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“Sway”

35.55% Lead arm line doesn’t match lead arm- bent

64.45% Lead arm line matches lead arm- straight

Defined-

A sway is any excessive lower body lateral movement away from the target during the backswing that forces the weight to the outside of the back foot. This fault makes it very difficult to develop a proper weight shift during transition and the downswing. If there is no stable platform to drive their weight off of during transition, golfers will lose power and inadvertently try to develop speed in an inefficient manner.

Causes-

1. Right Hip Internal rotation- is paramount for full rotation into the right hip without any lateral sway for a right handed golfer. If the body is unable to rotate around the right hip due to joint or muscular restriction, lateral movements will dominate the pattern.

2. Separation of Lower and Upper body- Separation of lower and upper body allows the lower body to laterally stabilize while rotating during a large shoulder turn. Limited trunk to pelvis separation is usually caused by reducing spinal mobility and shortened lat flexibility.

(tests- Torso Rotation, Seated Trunk Rotation, Half kneeling Rotation)

3. Glute Strength. The ability to stabilize the right leg during the backswing is directly proportional to the strength and stability of the glute muscles (your booty!) When it comes to lower body lateral stabilization, the glute medius is the king! It helps the right hip from elevating and shifting laterally during an aggressive coil into the right hip (tests- Hip Rotation, Single leg balance)

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Other causes-

1. Lack of understanding of proper technique
2. Injury to the hip, knee or ankle
3. Ball too far back in the stance

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sway

Defined-
A sway is any excessive lower body lateral movement away from the target during the backswing that forces the weight to the outside of the back foot. This fault makes it very difficult to develop a proper weight shift during transition and the downswing. If there is no stable platform to drive their weight off of during transition, golfers will lose power and inadvertently try to develop speed in an inefficient manner.

Causes-
1. Right Hip Internal rotation- is paramount for full rotation into the right hip without any lateral sway for a right handed golfer. If the body is unable to rotate around the right hip due to joint or muscular restriction, lateral movements will dominate the pattern.

2. Separation of Lower and Upper body- Separation of lower and upper body allows the lower body to laterally stabilize while rotating during a large shoulder turn. Limited trunk to pelvis separation is usually caused by reducing spinal mobility and shortened lat flexibility.

3. Glute Strength. The ability to stabilize the right leg during the backswing is directly proportional to the strength and stability of the glute muscles (your booty!) When it comes to lower body lateral stabilization, the glute medius is the king! It helps the right hip from elevating and shifting laterally during an aggressive coil into the right hip

Other causes-
1. Lack of understanding of proper technique
2. Injury to the hip, knee or ankle
3. Ball too far back in the stance

Sign up in the right hand corner for our Golf Starter Kit and you’ll find a golf fitness program that will  help you correct these issues!

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Dee here…and it looks like I can post again without my computer shutting down!

Stay tuned, cause I’m back on track!

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Tyler here with a golf fitness question and answer segment that you might enjoy.

Here was the recent email that we received regarding the golf fitness demands of a good backswing.

Fitness Guys,
My name is ____and I am an assistant golf pro in Phoenix and I am having minor issues with my golf swing and I believe they both have to do with fitness/flexibility. I constantly work on posture and I am an avid weight lifter. My two issues are, one, when i get to the top of my backswing i notice two things. One, my head actually drops (dips) a few inches during my backswing. I have studied pro swings and noticed that most will actually move a little away from the ball and then, on the down swing they swat (like tiger) or drive towards the ball. However, with my position I have to come out of my posture, which causes issues. The second problems I feel is related to the first. I can’t get my hand high at the top of my swing. They are not flat, but definitely not in the position like Tiger or Ernie. I think I developed that dip thinking that if I could turn under the ball more then i can get my hands higher, but both moves just suck. What can you recommend?

Well, thanks for the Golf Fitness question. Let me see what I can do. I’m sure you are not alone with your problem of losing posture at the top of the swing. I normally only change a back swing position if it is directly influencing the poor move on the downswing, in this case it appears to be. The most likely issue facing you is that you probably have developed tight lats. As a weight lifter, I’m sure you know how important lat strength is, but for golfers an even bigger factor is lat flexibility. The lat connects the arm to the the pelvis and is highly involved in rotation and in elevating the arm height in the back swing. To test if your lats are tight, stand with your entire back up against a wall or door and try to raise your arms straight up over your shoulders. If you cannot touch the wall with your thumbs while keeping your lower back up against the wall and keeping your arms straight then you most likely have tight lats and this will influence your golf swing.

Usually the golfer with tight lats will keep the left shoulder closer to the left hip by dipping the head down (and sometimes toward the ball) in an attempt to make a larger swing than the body will allow. We have a saying in golf fitness, “shorten your swing or lengthen your lats.” Now, because the lat connects on the upper arm, when it is tight it can also limit the amount of arm height you can achieve.

So assuming you have tight lats here are a few things you can do.
1. Foam roll your lats to remove trigger points
2. Perform lat stretches such as twisted lat stretch found in our free program.
3. Perform core activation exercises.

I have found that often times tight lats will not resolve themselves until you start integrating your abs into movements. Often the lats are overworked because of their ability to act as a core stabilizer in lieu of the deep core.

One final thought. I am not in the business of telling people what to enjoy, but I do like to educate – and you need to know that bench press (any form), pull ups, lat pull downs and any other internal rotation exercise can make your tight lat situation harder to correct. The shoulder external rotators (primarily infraspinatus) are very small compared to the size of the internal rotators (chest and lat). If you constantly stress the internal rotators in the gym it will be very tough to get the flexibility (turn and arm height) that you are looking for.

The top of the back swing only needs to be managed so that it doesn’t lead to problems on the downswing. Good luck golfers and keep sending us those questions.

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